Saturday, December 04, 2010

Envy...

Seven cardinal sins. Envy is definitely one of them.

I've been using Edge (now Enve composites) all mountain rims for a while now. If you read a few posts previously, you'll see that i've not exactly been overjoyed with tubeless conversions of my favourite tyres using No Tubes rims. Given that with 70+ mls of sealant, rim strips, valves and tape, I'm damn close to the weight of a light 26" tube (with 20ml of sealant in it) and light rim tape - which so far have only punctured (non-catastrophically i might add) twice on the Edge rims - the Vertigo is going to get a set of Edge/Enve AM rims on DT 440 hubs. Then i can finally get rid of the vague, flexy, aluminium rimmed wheels that have been oh-so apparent since i began using carbon rims. Yes i could use something like sun-ringle MTX 33's, or even Velocity P35's to get a robust rim, but at a huge weight penalty. As it stands, the Edge/Enve AM should weigh less than the Stans Flows i have currently, but be both wider and stiffer. What's not to like?



This set of wheels was previously ear marked for 'Project Maul' - more on this soon - but i have taken the decision to change tack with the Maul wheels. It is going to be a xc and endurance race bike. It will flip between rigid 1x9 (or maybe 10), singlespeed or a suspension fork. As such it would be handy if it could use qr, 9mm thru, 15mm or 20mm maxle (which is possible with DT swiss, and it will have a 150mm rear end (really, why are mountain bikes still being made with 135mm rear ends ? ).

The new Maul wheels will be DT 240 Oversize and 150mm rear hubs with either 28 or 32 DT revolution spokes with Edge/Enve composites xc 29er rim. It has taken a while to settle on this - i was originally thinking of using the 290g Enve tubular rims but Singular Cycles racer Gareth Michael Jones managed to overturn that decision single handedly!



All aboard the night train....

8 comments:

Chipps said...

Mountain bikes have 135mm rear ends because otherwise you smack your heels on the chainstays as they flare out to your enormous hub widths.

What do you need that much triangulation for anyway? Do you taco rims often?

dRjON said...

i dunno: with creative (double s bend style) stay forming and the generally wider q factor of HTII i cant see it being a major issue? and getting more equal spoke tension has got to be a good thing. theres also the improvement in chainline to consider....

davechopoptions said...

Surely chainline only improves with an 83mm BB (57mm c/l)?
With a 150 rear and a 68/73 BB it must be pretty skew-wiff?
83mm chainsets are restricted in terms of choices - esp for this XC build - no?

I'm confuddled...

velopest said...

yeah, i should qualify the chainline thing...cassettes are 36.3mm wide for 9 speed, 37.2 for 10sp iirc.
the cassette sits 5mm or so in from the dropout, so the centre of the cassette is about 18-19mm in from there, for a 150 hub /2 =75mm, -5mm =70mm-18.5mm =51.5mm which is the chainline at the centre of the rear gear spread.
which is pretty damn close the chainline of an HTII crank....esp if you mess with 1mm bb spacers and run a single ring :-)~

dRjON said...

i should add a HTII chainline is nominally 50mm...

davechopoptions said...

For pre-HTII c/sets, the recommended c/l was 47.5mm, with 50mm being the next best which was required by a few bikes. HTII required the catch all 50mm approach given that the axle length isn't interchangeable.
It seems that (by your calcs) it also will work with your odd contraptions....
;-)

Must admit though, not sure that the last sprocket is as far 5mm from the d/out though... When the garage thaws out, I might check...
;-)

Gareth said...

Jon, I feel very bad that you've made a decision based upon my inability not to roll tubulars! Don't forget that, on both occasions, I've been using Reynolds road rims and not enough glue - thanks to the DS of BS ;-)

dRjON said...

GMJ: dont worry!...there was also availability of treads etc!.. :-)~